500 Crystal Falls Pkwy, Leander, TX 78641, (512) 260-7400

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Posts for: February, 2014

By Crystal Falls Dental
February 21, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: denture  
ImmediateDenturesBridgetheGapBetweenToothLossandRestoration

Losing all of your teeth can be both physically and emotionally traumatic. Patients in this condition may need a period of transition from this loss to their permanent restoration. That’s the purpose of “immediate” dentures.

An immediate denture is a tooth appliance available for placement immediately after the final extraction so the patient’s ability to eat and speak isn’t unduly hampered (it also helps preserve their facial appearance). An immediate denture is a temporary measure until a more permanent replacement is achieved; hence, they’re not intended for long-term use.

Over time an immediate denture’s fit will deteriorate. This is because as the gums heal after extraction, and without the natural teeth present, the underlying bone and gum tissues will shrink significantly. The denture fit becomes looser, which leads to movement of the denture within the mouth. This can cause a good deal of discomfort emotionally and physically, and make it more difficult to eat and speak. It’s possible, however, to reline the immediate denture to fit the gum shrinkage and gain more service from it.

At some point, though, it’s necessary to transition from the immediate denture to the permanent restoration. If the permanent solution is a removable denture, we will need to wait until the gums have completely healed. At that time we will make a new and accurate impression of your mouth that reflects any changes since extraction. Even with this high level of accuracy, though, the final fit will depend on the amount of remaining bone and gum tissue needed to support the denture.

There are other options besides a removable denture. We can install a pair of implants in conjunction with a removable denture that can stabilize and retain it in the mouth; implants can also support a fixed bridge. You should weigh all the advantages and disadvantages to these options (including cost), to determine which one is the best solution for you.

In the meantime, the immediate denture will enable you to function in a normal manner, as well as aid with your appearance. Remember, though, it’s only meant for a short period of time — at some point you will need to transition from “immediate” to a more permanent and satisfying replacement.

If you would like more information on dentures, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Immediate Dentures.”


By Crystal Falls Dental
February 05, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: celebrity smiles  
WhatOralApplianceDoesOlivaNewton-JohnUsetoProtectHerteeth

Though it's been a while since Olivia Newton-John sang her way into our hearts in the movie Grease, her smile is as radiant as ever. Today, Olivia is still singing, acting and busy with new ventures such as authoring a cookbook and raising money for the cancer center that bears her name in Melbourne, Australia. Whichever part of the world Olivia finds herself in, she protects that beautiful smile with an oral appliance that many find beneficial.

“I wear a nightguard to prevent wear on my teeth, custom-made by my dentist,” Olivia recently told Dear Doctor magazine. “I love it!”

Olivia's device, also referred to as a bite (occlusal) guard, is designed for people who clench or grind their teeth at night, or during stressful periods. Made of thin, wear-resistant plastic, it is custom-made to fit exactly over your top teeth. This allows the bottom teeth to slide gently across the top teeth without biting into them. Not only does this prevent excessive tooth wear, it also helps relax the muscles of the jaw.

Grinding or “bruxing,” as it's also called, can affect virtually any part of the oral system: the jaw joints or muscles, resulting in spasm and pain; the teeth themselves, resulting in wear, fractures or looseness; it can even cause an aching in the ears, head, neck or back.

If you are a teeth-grinder, you might not even know it unless a sleeping partner hears it or your dentist notices signs of wear. These habits are called “parafunctional” (para – outside, function – normal), meaning the biting forces it generates are well outside the normal range — sometimes as much as 10 times normal. So it's no wonder that damage to teeth can occur if they are not protected.

If you have any questions about grinding habits or nightguards, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. If you would like to read Dear Doctor's entire interview with Olivia Newton-John, please see “Olivia Newton-John.” Dear Doctor also has more on “Stress & Tooth Habits.”